People who receive flu vaccine while hospitalized no more likely to require extra care than inpatients who are not vaccinated, suggests a large study

By Dr Deepu
 In a recent study, the researchers evaluated the risk of outcomes of interest between those who received influenza vaccination during their hospitalization vs those who were never vaccinated that season or were vaccinated at other times using propensity score analyses with inverse probability of treatment weighting. Outcomes of interest included rates of outpatient and emergency department visits, readmissions, fever, and clinical laboratory evaluations for infection (urine, blood, and wound culture; complete blood cell count) in the 7 days following discharge. Data on 290,149 US hospitalizations involving 255,737 patients over three consecutive flu seasons has suggested that patients who receive the flu vaccine while hospitalized are no more likely to develop fever or require extra doctor or hospital visits after they go home than inpatients who don’t get vaccinated. The author's have concluded that findings provide reassurance about the safety of influenza vaccination during hospitalization. Every contact with a health care professional, including during a hospitalization, is an opportunity to vaccinate. The findings were published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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